Friday, October 30, 2015

CNC Programming Tips the Professional Way (part 1 of 2)

When a program is completed and sent to the Computer Numerical Control Machine, the programming process is over. All calculations were made and the algorithm fully written. But the question is the programmer’s job really finished? When is the programmer’s responsibility really over? And how can we evaluate the type of program that the Computer Numerical Control Machine programmer did?

The fairest and reasonable answer to those questions would basically when a part has been machined under the most optimized working conditions. Therefore the Programmer’s responsibility does not end after he or she finishes the program. We could say that the program at this stage is still very much in the development process, because most of the programming considerations were based on certain assumptions and there are a lot of external factors that may affect the outcome of the product.

Every Computer Numerical Control programmer should have an effort to be in the touch with the actual production. In the field of software development, Constant communication with your colleagues as well as actual machine operators of the CNC will help you to improve your own program. Because most of the time the CNC machine operators are a good source of constructive ideas, improvements and suggestions.

A good CNC programmer should talk, ask questions to them and most importantly listen to what they have to say. Programmers who never put their foot in the actual machining process and think they are always right are all on the wrong track. Exchanging ideas with CNC machine operators, asking questions and seeking answers is the only way to be fully aware of what is going on in the machine.

Whenever you start a Computer Numerical Control Program the first time it is important to check its Program Integrity. A new and unproved program is a potential source of problems. During Manual Programming in CNC, mistakes are more common than when the program is made in a CAM program.

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